Is It Time For a Dental Dental Exam In Scottsdale, AZ?

It is important to receive a regular dental exam in Scottsdale, AZ that includes a good cleaning because regular dental visits are essential in preventing teeth decay. Your oral health is important, and you should not delay your dental exam in Scottsdale, AZ. In between exams there are proper dental hygiene steps you can follow to make sure you are caring for your teeth at all times.

We understand that sometimes people forget to make appointments with a dentist, or maybe some people just simply avoid making an appointment because they do not like visiting the dentist. However, it is important that everyone knows that a dental visit can spot oral health and medical health problems.

Dr. Steven Poulos and Dr. Sid Stevens agree that if you ignore your oral health for either you or your children, there can be serious problems in the future. You may think you only have a cavity or a chipped tooth, but as time goes on that one problem can turn into multiple dental problems that can be really painful.

If you are one of those people who have skipped or rescheduled countless dental appointments for years, how will you know when it is time to walk into your dentist's office?

  • You have significant pain in your mouth
  • When you eat anything, whether hot or cold, your teeth are extremely sensitive
  • Your breath is not fresh, and you can not get that taste or smell to go away
  • You have trouble chewing food and swallowing
  • You have frequent mouth sores

If you think it's time for a dental exam in Scottsdale, AZ, don't delay. Your oral health is important and it should not be ignored.

Contact us  at My Scottsdale Dentist today for a consultation or to schedule an appointment.


Post Date: April 23, 2015

Supervised Tooth Brushing in Schools

Supervised teeth brushing may happen at school in some places.

A supervising body in England and Wales recently detailed its new recommendations for healthcare and one of the policies included supervised brushing programs in school and nurseries. The goal is to lower the prevalence of decay among children.

Recent statistics indicate that 10 percent of 3-year-olds in England and Wales show signs of dental decay even though the condition could easily be prevented. In some places, more than half of 5-year-olds have decaying teeth. Dentists throughout the United Kingdom have reported more children than in the past need extensive procedures resulting from decaying teeth.

In addition to monitoring brushing, adding more fluoride varnish is pivotal.

As it stands now, many of these children will have major dental problems when they are adults.

The areas with the poorest oral health were areas where poverty is highest.

 


Post Date: November 10, 2014

Not just for the heart, red wine shows promise as cavity fighter

For anyone searching for another reason to enjoy a glass of red wine with dinner, here's a good one: A new study has found that red wine, as well as grape seed extract, could potentially help prevent cavities. They say that their report, which appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, could lead to the development of natural products that ward off dental diseases with fewer side effects.

M. Victoria Moreno-Arribas and colleagues explain that dental diseases are extremely common throughout the world. Cavities, periodontal disease and tooth loss affect an estimated 60 to 90 percent of the global population. The problems start when certain bacteria in the mouth get together and form biofilms, which are communities of bacteria that are difficult to kill. They form plaque and produce acid, which starts damaging teeth. Brushing, fluoride in toothpaste and water and other methods can help get rid of bacterial plaques, but the effects are limited. In addition, currently used antimicrobial rinses can change the color of the gums and alter taste, so people are less likely to use them for as long as they should. Some research has suggested that polyphenols, grape seed extract and wine can slow bacterial growth, so Moreno-Arribas' team decided to test them under realistic conditions for the first time.

They grew cultures of bacteria responsible for dental diseases as a biofilm. They dipped the biofilms for a couple of minutes in different liquids, including red wine, red wine without the alcohol, red wine spiked with grape seed extract, and water and 12 percent ethanol for comparison. Red wine with or without alcohol and wine with grape seed extract were the most effective at getting rid of the bacteria.


Post Date: August 8, 2014

Is Cosmetic Dentistry in Scottsdale, AZ Right For You?

With today's world of perfect celebrities with gleaming white smiles, having teeth that need work can lead to lower self-esteem and feeling like you don't want to smile at all. There are many forms of Cosmetic Dentistry in Scottsdale, AZ that can not only make you look better but make you feel more confident as well.

  •  Veneers. Veneers are the perfect way to change your teeth and make them look better. These are a very fine piece of porcelain that can cover up a variety of tooth issues, from discoloration to chipped teeth and damaged teeth. What is great about veneers is that you can choose the shade, shape, and size to get an entirely different look or enhance the look you already have.
  • Dental Implants. Dental Implants are ideal for those that want a permanent solution to missing teeth. They're better than dentures because they are fitted into the jaw bone so that they are a stable and fixed solution.
  • Dentures. Missing or loose teeth affects not only your appearance but can make eating and enjoying food harder. Dentures are a solution that gives you a customized fit and since they are easy to maintain, they offer an easy way of fixing your teeth. These are typically lower in cost than some other Cosmetic Dentistry solutions so they are good for those on a more fixed budget as well.
  • Teeth Whitening. Teeth whitening is a good fix for those that simply have stained or discolored teeth. My Scottsdale Dentist is proud to utilize the Venus Tooth Whitening System to give you a brighter, whiter smile.
  • Invisalign and Orthodontics. Having straight teeth is possible with Invisalign and Orthodontics. Whether you choose Invisalign, which is an invisible type solution or traditional Orthodontics, Dr. Steven Poulos and Dr. Sid Stevens are there to help you every step of the way. Either solution can help you obtain the straight teeth and perfect look that you want.

No matter what issue you need correcting with your teeth, if you have asked yourself, "Is Cosmetic Dentistry right for me?" then My Scottsdale Dentist can help you make the right decision. If you want to talk to us or learn more simply contact us so we can help.


Post Date: August 1, 2014

Veneers in Scottsdale Make Your Smile the Way You Want

Veneers in Scottsdale offer an alternative to a beautiful smile. It's rare that someone has perfect teeth. While it may look like every celebrity has a straight, white smile, most of them may have had help getting that look. In fact, some of the best teeth in Hollywood used to be some of the worst. If you're still not convinced, check out Tom Cruise before he had his teeth done or Ben Affleck from a few years back.

Whether you have crooked, damaged, stained, or teeth that you don't like, getting Veneers in Scottsdale can ensure that you have the look that you want. Best of all, Dr. Steven Poulos and Dr. Sid Stevens at My Scottsdale Dentist make it easy for you.

You simply go in and have your teeth prepared for the Veneers and if they're composite Veneers then it only takes one appointment typically. If you choose ceramic ones it takes a couple of more visits. The good news is that you you get to see each Veneer as it is placed on your teeth where the color can be adjusted to suit your needs. Once you're satisfied with the look the Veneers in Scottsdale are cemented in and you're all set.

Once you have your new Veneers in Scottsdale you can finally have the look you want. It not only adds confidence to your smile but it'll help your appearance and add to your success in life.

If you want to learn more about choosing Veneers or anything about My Scottsdale Dentist, just contact us and we can help.


Post Date: July 29, 2014

Deep cleaning in Scottsdale: steps to prevent gum disease

According to the Center for Disease Control, over half of all American adults suffer from periodontal disease. If you are one of these people, you should know two very important facts: the first is that you're not alone. Periodontal disease is very common, but that doesn't make it something you should tolerate because it can have a drastic effect on your overall health. The second thing you should know is how to treat it. If you have gum disease, you should look into deep cleaning in Scottsdale at My Scottsdale Dentist to help correct the symptoms. Because there is no cure for periodontal disease, regular visits to the dentist are very important.

Recognizing the signs

One of the best things you can do to take care of your teeth, whether or not you have gum disease, is make regular appointments with your dentist and practice a good dental care regimen at home. If you notice early warning signs for gum disease, you'll want to make an appointment for deep cleaning at My Scottsdale Dentist in Scottsdale as soon as possible. Early warning signs for periodontal disease include:

  • Red or swollen gums
  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Receding gums
  • Loose teeth

Home care for healthy dental health

Brush your teeth. When we talk about brushing teeth, we don't mean smear some toothpaste on your teeth with a toothbrush and rinse it off. We mean scrubbing for at least three minutes first thing in the morning, after meals, and before you go to bed at night.

Floss. Floss will help remove bacteria that a toothbrush can't reach because it's located in between the teeth or just under the gum line.

Use mouth rinse. Some mouth rinses are more effective than others. Please discuss with your dentist the most effective toothpaste and mouth rinse for your dental care. When you use mouth rinse, allow it to contact all your teeth and gums for at least thirty seconds. Mouth rinse will help kill harmful mouth bacteria.

Watch what you eat and drink. Food that lingers on teeth can lead to cavities by attracting harmful bacteria. Sugary beverages, especially dark sodas, can damage or discolor teeth. If you do drink sugary beverages drink water afterward to wash the sugar off your teeth.

Advanced treatment for periodontal disease

If you have advanced gum disease, you'll want to begin taking care of the symptoms by making regular appointments for deep cleaning in Scottsdale. Depending on your particular circumstances, this could mean deep cleaning every three to six months and root planing and scaling in Scottsdale every six months. Deep cleaning will help get rid of bacteria below the gum line, which assists gum health, allowing them to support your teeth better. Root planing smooths away rough surfaces on the root surface. A rough surface allows bacteria to adhere better deep under the gums and can affect long-term tooth health.

In addition to regular dental visits, follow your dentist's recommendations for home care. For more information about deep cleaning or root planing and scaling in Scottsdale, including the exact procedure, how long it will take and the duration of the recovery period (usually after the anesthetic wears off you're back to normal with possible pain medication but should avoid certain foods until your gums fully recover), please contact us.

 


Post Date: July 4, 2014

Study shows a link may exist between poor oral hygiene and dementia

Study shows a link may exist between poor oral hygiene and dementia

If you're like most adults, you've heard since you were a kid that oral hygiene is important. The message probably started with your parent and was reinforced by school teachers and dentists like Dr. Poulos at My Scottsdale Dentist.

Now as an adult you likely realize that oral hygiene is a critical component of healthy teeth and gums, fewer cavities, and overall mouth health. A study has shown, however, that there may be reasons you didn't know about as a kid to make regular visits to your dentist. This study shows that there is a strong correlation between people with poor oral hygiene and dementia. It might be time to schedule an appointment with My Scottsdale Dentist to review your dental hygiene.

Correlation doesn't show causation, but in this case there's more than just a simple coincidence of effect. You might guess that someone with dementia is likely to not take very good care of their teeth. That's true and previous studies have shown that very fact. This study, however, has located a specific gum-disease-causing bacteria in the brain of some patients. The name of the bacteria is called Porphyromonas gingivalis and of the ten people with dementia assessed in this study, four of them had this bacteria in their brain as well. Other studies have already found correlations between inflammation in periodontal disease caused by Porphyromonas gingivalis and conditions like Alzheimer's.

According to The University of Central Lancashire, Sim Singhrao, a senior research fellow for this project, made the following statement:

"We are working on the theory that when the brain is repeatedly exposed to bacteria and/or debris from our gums, subsequent immune responses may lead to nerve cell death and possibly memory loss."

From WebMD, St John Crean, dean of the School of Medicine and Dentistry made the following comment:

"[...] it remains to be proven whether poor dental hygiene can lead to dementia in healthy people. It is also likely that these bacteria could make the existing disease condition worse."

Ten people is not a large number, but forty percent is, so before any further conclusions can be drawn, this study will need to be repeated with a larger sample size. Given that infections in the mouth can pass to the brain, as has been seen with abscessed root canals, it's not difficult to imagine that an insult to the gums or teeth can provide a passageway for a blood-borne pathogen to mobilize from the mouth, a few inches away to the brain.

Whether or not Alzheimer's or other dementia-related neurological disorders are caused or worsened by bacteria, the correlation and consistent finding of periodontal bacteria in the brain makes the point, at least for us, that regular visits to the dentist do more than improve dental health they also seem to statistically improve mental health. For more information about the ways regular dental care can improve your overall health, please contact My Scottsdale Dentist and make an appointment today.


Post Date: June 27, 2014

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

We all know how important good oral hygiene is for healthy teeth and a winning smile. What many people may not be aware of, though, is how important oral hygiene is to our overall health. My Scottsdale Dentist understands just how important good oral hygiene is to our patients over all health.

Daily brushing and flossing not only helps keep your teeth clean and breath fresh, it also helps to control bacteria on teeth. When bacteria build up, the gums are more likely to become infected. When gums are infected, they become inflamed as a result of the immune system's efforts to combat the infection.

 

Periodontitis

Chemicals produced by inflamed gums damage the gums and the bone structure that holds the teeth. Periodontitis is the disease that results from inflamed gums and can cause health problems throughout the body. A 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report stated that people with periodontal disease are 40% more likely to have chronic health conditions than those with healthy gums.

 

Oral Hygiene and Other Health Conditions

In recent years, researchers have been studying the relationship between oral hygiene and other conditions to better understand the connection. An article in WebMD listed several health conditions that are more likely to affect people who have periodontitis:

 

Diabetes Inflammation impairs the body's ability to use insulin properly for controlling blood sugar. This results in a kind off negative feedback loop, where high blood sugar helps to feed the infections and make the inflammation even worse.

 

Heart Disease Heart disease patients are more likely to have periodontitis than people without heart disease by a ratio of 91% to 66%. The mechanisms for this connection are not yet fully understood. One theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes blood vessels elsewhere to become inflamed. This inflammation restricts blood flow in the body, causing the heart to work harder, which increases blood pressure.

 

Cancer Studies have reported a "surprising" connection between gum disease and the risk for various cancers.

Gerald P. Curatola, D.D.S. wrote in Dr. OZ Magazine: "...gum disease has been identified as the body's most abundant source of chronic low-grade inflammation which is described as smoldering fire in your body where the alarm bell is not answered. This causes a decrease in the body's immune response, and eventually, irreversible damage to the immune system, which is being identified as a likely factor for the increased cancer risk."

 

Pregnancy Hormonal changes women experience during pregnancy can increase their risk for periodontitis. Development of a fetus in the womb may be interfered with by infection and inflammation in other parts of the body. Many factors can contribute to low birth weight and premature birth. Researchers are still studying this connection.

As research continues into the importance of oral hygiene to overall health, My Scottsdale Dentist will continue to keep you informed of the best ways to protect your dental health. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.


Post Date: June 20, 2014

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

Why Good Oral Hygiene is Important in Preventing Disease

We all know how important good oral hygiene is for healthy teeth and a winning smile. What many people may not be aware of, though, is how important oral hygiene is to our overall health. My Scottsdale Dentist understands just how important good oral hygiene is to our patients over all health.

Daily brushing and flossing not only helps keep your teeth clean and breath fresh, it also helps to control bacteria on teeth. When bacteria build up, the gums are more likely to become infected. When gums are infected, they become inflamed as a result of the immune system's efforts to combat the infection.

Periodontitis

Chemicals produced by inflamed gums damage the gums and the bone structure that holds the teeth. Periodontitis is the disease that results from inflamed gums and can cause health problems throughout the body. A 2011 Centers for Disease Control (CDC) report stated that people with periodontal disease are 40% more likely to have chronic health conditions than those with healthy gums.

Oral Hygiene and Other Health Conditions

In recent years, researchers have been studying the relationship between oral hygiene and other conditions to better understand the connection. An article in WebMD listed several health conditions that are more likely to affect people who have periodontitis:

Diabetes Inflammation impairs the body's ability to use insulin properly for controlling blood sugar. This results in a kind off negative feedback loop, where high blood sugar helps to feed the infections and make the inflammation even worse.

Heart Disease Heart disease patients are more likely to have periodontitis than people without heart disease by a ratio of 91% to 66%. The mechanisms for this connection are not yet fully understood. One theory is that inflammation in the mouth causes blood vessels elsewhere to become inflamed. This inflammation restricts blood flow in the body, causing the heart to work harder, which increases blood pressure.

 Cancer Studies have reported a "surprising" connection between gum disease and the risk for various cancers.

Gerald P. Curatola, D.D.S. wrote in Dr. OZ Magazine: "...gum disease has been identified as the body's most abundant source of chronic low-grade inflammation which is described as a smoldering fire in your body where the alarm bell is not answered. This causes a decrease in the body's immune response, and eventually, irreversible damage to the immune system, which is being identified as a likely factor for the increased cancer risk."

Pregnancy Hormonal changes women experience during pregnancy can increase their risk for periodontitis. Development of a fetus in the womb may be interfered with by infection and inflammation in other parts of the body. Many factors can contribute to low birth weight and premature birth. Researchers are still studying this connection.

As research continues into the importance of oral hygiene to overall health, My Scottsdale Dentist will continue to keep you informed of the best ways to protect your dental health. Contact us to schedule your next appointment.


Post Date: June 5, 2014

Foods For Healthier Teeth: 7 Things To Eat Right Now

We all know the basics of good oral care: brush in the morning and evening, floss each day and visit the dentist twice per year. But there are smaller, incremental steps we can take to guarantee good health, including the food we eat each day. Nutrition is important for every cell in our bodies -- and that naturally extends to teeth and gums. In particular, food choices feed the mouth's live-in nemesis: plaque-causing bacteria, according to an explainer from the Yale School of Medicine. They wrote: When you drink and munch starchy or sugary foods, you're not only feeding yourself, you're feeding the plaque that can cause havoc in your mouth ... When sugars or starches in your mouth come in contact with plaque, the acids that result can attack teeth for 20 minutes or more after you finish eating. Repeated attacks can break down the hard enamel on the surface of teeth, leading to tooth decay. Plaque also produces toxins that attack the gums and bone supporting the teeth. Avoid any food that combines sugar, acid and stickiness, adds Miriam R. Robbins DDS, Associate Chair of the Department of Oral and Maxiofacial Pathology, Radiology and Medicine at the New York University College of Dentistry. Enemy #1 in her opinion? Sour, chewy candies like Starburst and Skittles. As for brushing away the bad food, Robbins recommends caution: brushing too soon after a highly acidic or sugary meal can actually cause additional damage to teeth, the enamel of which is softened immediately following contact with "bad" food. She recommends waiting at least 20 to 40 minutes before whipping out a toothbrush. But if starch, acid and sugar (along with overenthusiastic brushing!) are tooth killers, what can we provide in place of them? Overall, look for items that stimulate saliva production, which has a neutralizing effect on acid. That's because saliva naturally contains bicarbonate, which neutralizes acid, as well as calcium and phosphate which help to "re-mineralize" the tooth's surface, according Mark S. Wolff DDS, Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Cariology and Comprehensive Care, also at the NYU College of Dentistry. Other acid neutralizers, like those found in dairy can also help prevent tooth decay and gum disease. Click here to see the list of 7 foods Below, seven foods that have been shown to help in the research or clinical practice:

Post Date: May 26, 2014